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We Need Censorship Argumentative Persuasive Essays

We Need Censorship


It won’t kill us to make limits, but it might if we don’t. That is why it is JUSTIFIABLE to limit adult’s freedom of expression–it is in our, society’s, best interests to protect the children. Lional Tate is just one example of a child gone bad because of the media. Tate mimicked his idol the Rock, killing a six-year old girl by smashing her skull, pulverizing her liver, breaking her ribs and causing numerous cuts and bruises. If that’s not enough of an example what about the teen from New Jersey who simply listened to Ozzy Osborne’s “Suicide Solution” and killed himself? These are not random occurrences, we hear about them on the news frequently. If our freedom of expression is harming kids why can’t we fix the problem by not allowing them access to it?

Argument one, People, especially children are very susceptible to being influenced by what they watch or see happen throughout their lives.

“Monkey see, Monkey do.” Everyone has heard this phrase sometime in his or her life. This phrase is simple, yet very applicable to today’s debate. When a child sees someone or something doing something. They will of course follow suit and imitate the action being performed. Children do not know any better. Therefore they are innocent and deserve to be respected. It is for these following reasons that we argue for the censorship of harmful materials that could influence a child or children into violent acts, expressions, and other dangerous actions. Through television, video games, and movies, children and teens view countless acts of violence, brutality, and terror as part of entertainment. They become conditioned to associating violence with entertainment. First-person shooter video games develop our children’s skills in operating weapons. The games reward marksmanship, and further reinforce the association of killing with entertainment. In the past, the heroes of movie and television shows were usually people who strictly followed the law. Now, heroes are often people who take the law into their own hands, who see an injustice or evil and seek to rectify it personally, sometimes brutally, regardless of the consequences. Such portrayals signal, to a child, society’s approval of that behavior. Lacking the judgment that comes with age, a child who feels he has been dealt with unfairly may copy that behavior, with disastrous consequences.

John Stuart Mill on free expression: “The sole end for which mankind is warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of any of their number is self protection.” Free expression is a wonderful thing, in principle. It is the foundation of a democratic society and many of the principles that modern society is based upon. Unfortunately, there is also a darker side: the detriment certain kinds of expression can have on children’s development. The same children that will one day be the teachers, politicians and businesspersons of the world. If they are allowed to be exposed to less than the best in their formative years, the results might be a society without morals, children without moral fiber or integrity, mentally scarred by the horrors they have been exposed to. An eight year-old boy and a ten year-old accomplice now face charges of rape and sexual molestation after forcing another student to have sex with the eight-year old. Both told police that they had learned about sex from a pornographic video that the eight year-old’s father had rented. The eight year-old told police after watching the tape that ‘I wanted to have sex with her.’ Pornography is just one of the forms of expression taken too far and is detrimental to the children of America.

Here’s an interesting study that was done many years ago to make a point. I’ll set it up, then you guess what happened. A teacher made a special video to show her class of third graders. The video was shot in a school playroom with lots of toys that 5-year-olds really like. One of the toys was an inflated Bobo doll that stood about as tall as a first grader. Near Mr. Bobo was a large plastic baseball bat. What the teacher did is this.

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